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Western Arthurs Gear List and Review

I thought it might be interesting for those who hike a lot as well as those who don’t do much hiking to take a look at how I felt various pieces of equipment performed during our 6 day 5 night hike in the Western Arthurs. I’d say it was a pretty stern test for most pieces of gear as we experienced all sorts of conditions during that time. I’ll divide it into a few sections and I’d love to hear your comments if you’ve had more experience with a certain product or you want to know some more. Where products are currently available, I’ve tried to include links in case you’re looking!

Outer Gear

  1. Berghaus Jacket : (too old to find a link) 9/10 . This black jacket has been with me for over 10 years now and is still going strong. Waterproof in light rain but as with other fancy jackets that claim 100% waterproof, it eventually does get wet when the rain persists for hours and comes in all different angles.
  2. Cheap rain pants ($20 from Rays): 5/10. They were super light and did a surprisingly good job at keeping out the water. I wore them over my hiking pants and gaiters . The 5/10 is because they were not at all durable and eventually ripped after snagging on a branch. I might look into some lightweight gortex alternatives eventually.
  3. Sea to summit Quagmire gaiters: 10/10. Can’t complain about these. Relatively light, did the job as best they could. Even when the buttons were clogged with mud and couldn’t snap shut, the velcro held out the moisture and mud .
  4. Salmon midcut boots: 9/10 : Remained waterproof throughout except when water came in from above. Awesomely comfortable for my wide feet. No blisters or even a hint of them despite some long days .
  5. Various beanies , gloves, neck warmers did fine. Nothing special about these that deserved mention nor a need for getting anything fancier than what I had.

Food and Food preparation

  1. Jetboil: 10/10. These are simply amazing for weight and convenience ‘if’ you are just preparing rehydrated meals. Not for anyone who actually likes to ‘cook’ while on the trek. This was never on the cards so it didn’t matter to me. 1 small sized gas cannister lasted the whole trip with some to spare. I used it for every lunch and every dinner on the track.
  2. Utensils: 1/10 I had some polycarbonate utensils that snapped early in the trip. Note to self : get some titanium ones for future treks. I brought a mug with me but really didn’t need to use it since I didn’t bring any hot drinks or soups as such!!
  3. Meals : 0-7/10. I went freeze dried meals for both lunches and dinners. Snowys outdoor store has them at a great price and free shipping around Australia.  It was great for weight conservation, not good for the stomach. Overall, backcountry meals tasted OK and were easier on the stomach. For some reason, ‘outdoor gourmet’ brand tasted great but had terrible effects on my stomach causing diarrhoea on a few of the nights. At the end of a long day’s hike, I could easily finish a double serving for dinner (175g for backcountry or 195g for outdoor gourmet) but ended up giving some of my food to others where we were ‘base camping’ from a location. Mind you, I do only weigh 60kg. For convenience, you may wish to avoid meals which require opening two packets (often a second packet of mash). On future trips, I will be trying lunch wraps with packaged tuna and perhaps a box of rivita type biscuits with a tub of peanut butter . The BBQ pork I brought however, was amazing and I should have brought more than 2 packages for treats!
  4. Snacks: 7/10. I think it’s easy to overthink the snacks. Basically, bring what you’re going to eat and what you’re going to find palatable. I thought it would be a good idea to mix up M&Ms, raisins and nuts for trail mix. I ended up hating the nuts portion of it because guess what, I don’t snack on nuts at home. I wouldn’t worry about food groups too much for a trip of this duration , just make sure nothing goes to waste and the nuts did go to waste as I ate all around them in the end. Muesli Bars were great – I consumed about 2 a day on top of the 1kg of trail mix I brought. Just don’t bring anything crumbly or you’ll be sucking it out of the packets.
  5. Drinks : Water from flowing sources in the Tassie highlands was fine. I did bring a Sawyer filter system and used it when we were forced to camp at the top of Alpha Moraine on day 1 without any flowing water in sight. Filtering puddled water seemed a good strategy. I brought enough gatorade for 4L but wouldn’t do it again. There were times when I just wanted pure water and my nalgene 1L bottle was filled with gatorade. Unless of course you plan on bringing two water systems (which I didn’t : just a 1L bottle and 2L of sawyer fillable sachets for filtering). In the future, I’m going back to drinking pre-prepared milo/powdered milk/sugar combinations with meals.

** All up the meals and snacks weighed about 4kg**

Clothing:

  1. Pants: I found no role for softshell pants on their own for this trek. Though comfortable and relatively weather resistant, once wet, these weigh a ton and take forever to dry out and still need additional cover for extreme conditions. This was my experience from last years trip, so this year, I opted not to bring any and just hiked in regular hiking pants that had a zipoff option. This worked well for me. Camp shorts were useful for the warm day we had. Keeping a clean pair of thermals for the evenings was useful. Gross as this sounds, I only changed underpants every 2nd day but hey, the clean ones were only going to get soiled immediately yea??
  2. Tops: I’ve tried all sorts of stuff from merino to just simple sports running tops. For the conditions we were in, normal running T shirts did the job just fine. In fact, I just wore one the whole trip. Nothing fancy required. Merino stuff (I’ve found) just tends to rip with repeated use, and wearing it as a T shirt rather than a warming layer seems very cost ineffective to me. I also find they stink MORE when wet with my sweat (a personal oddity perhaps?). A thermal top for night time was also great. A mid layer is also good for the cooler days and while resting. I brought a down jacket but it never really got cold enough to require it so it was consigned to pillow duty at night.
  3. Other: I brought three pairs of explorer socks and like the jocks, changed them every 2nd day – often for pscyhological benefit.  A pair of cheap crocs is useful for walking around campsites as well.
  4. How many sets of cloths? Too much! I actually brought 2 pairs of most things and ended up using one of everything I’ve mentioned above. That’s a fair bit of weight and space you’re saving. The second set ended up being used for the car ride home to feel clean but these could have been left in the car.
  5. Dry sacks: You want clothes to be 100% dry at the end of the day so despite the waterproofness of your bag, I’d still stuff clothes in a dry sack. Oh and reserve one for ‘that’ vomit inducing bag of soiled clothes that you’ll eventually have to rinse out on your return!

Pack / Tent / Sleeping

  1. One planet 80l Strezlecki backpack: 9/10. I’ve had this tank of a pack for the last 7 years now and have had no issues with its durability or waterproof-ness. Even in the horizontal rain from this trip, or drenching fiordland rain around Milford sound – the water simply does not penetrate despite hours of constant exposure (without a rain cover either).  The only issue is that because of its toughness, it is fairly rigid and compared to the packs the other guys were carrying, there were far less options to attach gear on the exterior. My narrow waist means its always a challenge to find a pack with the right length yet be able to strap tightly enough around my waist to reduce the burden on my shoulders. This pack has done it the best of several I have tried.
  2. Hilleberg Nammatj2 : 9/10  Tank of a tent and withstood winds which I’m told were getting up to 80km gusts (possibly more?). Roomy inside for 2 and the vestibule is fairly large but can get filled quite easily with 2 occupants’ gear.
  3. Talus I sleeping bag with +8degree liner. 9/10 This was a good combination for me. The Talus weighs in at only 850g and combined with the liner, I was toasty and warm though the nights did not get below 5 degrees (I don’t think). I’m a very cold sleeper. I would need a warmer bag for colder conditions
  4. Sea to summit sleeping mat: 9/10: No issues at all with this. Before I started using these, I’d have restless nights sleep due to comfort. No longer! by 60kg bony frame does not touch the ground any more. The R value of the mat I was using was 3.3 – again more than adequate for the conditions we experienced.

Camera Gear

  1. 5dmk4 : This was my main camera of the trip paired up with the 16-35 lens most of the time. This isn’t a camera review but rather how suitable it is for a multiday trek. Durability was no issue though I did not test it in serious moisture. The AF did very well for ‘on the go’ images. I went through 2 batteries during the trip (not right down to 0%)  while firing off about 900 images. One thing that is very useful about the mk4 is the touch screen. I don’t feel like I have to use a remote when using the mk4 as even the slightest of glances will trigger the shutter and it can be used for bulb exposures.
  2. Sony A7r2 : I brought this along as Luke and Tim were both Sony users so it was good to have some redundancy. Since I brought it with me, I actually ended up using it quite a lot. For shoots after the first day, I was shooting with a 2 camera setup with each lens attached ready to go depending on whether I wanted a wide or telephoto style of image. To have this setup brings significant weight but I didn’t have any issue with carrying 25-28kg on my back for this trip so I would do the same for future trips. Despite not using it as much as the mk4 I still did go through 2 battery lifes for 400 shots. The convenience of the sony over the canon being that you can charge it directly and that if you’re using native lenses, it is a lighter setup.
  3. Gopro hero5: This was sturdy , provided great footage and I basically did not have to worry about it even any conditions. I’d bring it along for future trips without hesitation. The battery life went down to 50% a few times and was recharged without issue.
  4. Canon 16-35 F4L : Definitely bring a wide angle with you to the Arthurs. The F4 was even usuable for night images when paired with the 2 bodies I was using which had great high iso capability. AT 800+ grams, it’s quite a weight investment for the hike though.
  5. Canon 70-200 F4L : It’s personal choice as to whether you bring a mid range zoom like the 24-70 or 70-200 or a second lens at all! I used the 70-200 quite a bit and it gives many different opportunities for compressing planes and for images of people perched on ledges. I ‘d say bring the second lens only if photography is your primary priority for the trip. I’d have lived with just the wide angle though the 70-200F4 actually weighs less than the 16-35!
  6. Sirui K30x ballhead and N220 series tripod: These aren’t the lightest of tripods or combinations but they definitely did the job when the wind was blowing. Once again, how close you stick to your ‘normal’ set up depends on how high photography lies on your priority list when hiking in the wilderness. A sturdy tripod will be missed on a trip like this especially if you are planning on shooting long exposures.
  7. Nisi V5 pro and filters : To this point I have been more than happy with any Nisi product I have received. The V5pro holder is the sole exception. Unfortunately I received this very shortly before departure so its limitations came as a surprise on the trip. Once again, this post isn’t a photographic gear review as such so I will say that the holder itself is sturdy and more than capable of withstanding a wilderness trip. Just use the regular V5 if you’re a Nisi user.  All up , my hard case and 5 filters I brought weighed close to a kilogram but it is my shooting style to use filters and I had accustomed myself to carry all of this gear. A rectangular slot-in filter kit could be foregone for simple screw on NDs if you want to do long exposures. For me, my regular set up is worth its weight in order to get the best out of the scenery photographically.
  8. Aquapac Stormproof : I used this case as a ‘front pack’ strapped on to my backpack straps with carabiners. This worked quite well for me (even if a little squeaky at times). I had no concerns with moisture infiltration as the case is pretty well described by its name. Ergonomically though, it’s not the easiest thing in the world to stuff a DSLR + UWA along with a second lens. Getting things in and out could be a little frustrating.
  9. Other camera accessories: Along with the filters, a few other odds and ends were stored in a waist pouch which sat on my hips attached to a waist belt. Inside the case were a ziplock bag of Kim wipes (highly recommended and easily obtainable from any friend you might have working in health care or science!), an air blower, a hahnel remote for the sony, a second neck warmer to use as a blackout tool for long exposures, 5 canon spare batteries and 3 sony spare batteries. I brought a rain cover which I never had to use.
The 16-35mm F4 lens gives a great sunstar - if you happen to see the sun!

The 16-35mm F4 lens gives a great sunstar – if you happen to see the sun!

Layers of mountain shaped by wind and time. Taken with the 70-200

Layers of mountain shaped by wind and time. Taken with the 70-200

Other Electronic

  1. Headlamp : I  used a pretty standard Kathmandu headlamp. Nothing exciting to say here.
  2. Charger: Xiaomi make an awesome 16000mah charger. During this trip, I charged 2 sony batteries, my go pro a few times and my phone to some degree every day and it still read 2/4 bars. This is a good weight investment if you need it for those purposes.
  3. Mobile phone /GPS : I had a Samsung galaxy 7 with Avenza and view ranger apps installed. Both worked fine on a previous trip to Canada but for some reason, the location finder chose not to work on this trip??? This made solo trips on my first visit more risky and I was disappointed that this did not work as intended. It now seems to be back working since I’ve come home? I’ll have to find out why it didn’t work during the last trip before I can take in confidence anywhere as my sole navigational device.
  4. My Garmin forerunner 235 watch went for the whole trip without needing a charge (though I did not record any activities).
I didn't get to wander up to Mount Hesperus due to phone GPS failure

I didn’t get to wander up to Mount Hesperus due to phone GPS failure

Personal/Safety

  1. Toiletries : Normal toothpaste and toothbrush were fine though I did worry if the toothbrush was going to snap like my cutlery. I brought a whole toilet roll and used 2/3 of it (with several nights of diarrhoea mind you). For this trip, I successfully controlled my pace not to sweat too much so I didn’t feel like i missed having the option of getting clean with wipes but I did see the other guys using them regularly.
  2. Sunscreen is essential  . I bought one which was a combined insect repellant and did not come away with any insect bites for the whole trip? I think that’s got to be a first!
  3. A small bottle of alcohol hand gel can serve two purposes. The first is for cleanliness around food preparation. The second, is to use any leftovers at the end of the trip to wipe down feet/socks and boot interiors with . I’ve found this to be a fantastic deodourising strategy , particularly if a plane flight or bus ride is coming up!
  4. Map and Compass should be part of anyone’s kit over and above the electronic equipment.
  5. PLB. We had three of these in our group and there was only one occasion where I borrowed one when going shooting alone. It’s advisable to have at least 1 between 2 on a trip like this I would think.

So there you have it ! Pretty much everything that I had on my back or wore during the trip. Your thoughts would be appreciated 😉

All of us pretty much brought our regular tripods - it was a Sirui convention in the wilderness!

All of us pretty much brought our regular tripods – it was a Sirui convention in the wilderness!

Deep Creek Landscapes

Over the last weekend, Marianne and I went in search of more landscapes.
Starting from Friday evening at Morialta Falls, we visited Hallett Cove on Saturday dawn, Deep Creek during Saturday and Saturday night before returning to Adelaide amid the showers and storms of Sunday.
These are some of the images.

1. The base of Morialta’s second falls. 10 second timer and a scramble up some wet rocks for this cheesy self portrait.

2. Hallett Cove at dawn : The beach faces west and the sun rises from the north east at this time of year. The feature of this area of coastline is it’s ridges of curved rock which are particularly striking at low tide. The magenta hues of the rock are unique to the area as well.

3. Blowhole Beach : This was our intended sunset shoot , however, later in the day we came to realise that the whole area was already in shadow by mid afternoon. To make the most of it, we used our ND500 to get much longer than usual exposures of the water flowing into the sea.

4. Deep Creek Waterfall: This beautiful waterfall lies at the end of a rather steep trail which traversed some muddy sections. There was a large collection of slowly moving foam in the area making exposures difficult to compose for save for a super long exposure using the ND500.

5. Kangaroos leaping off into the sunset above blowhole beach. Try as we might, these roos just wouldn’t trust us – a parting shot as they left our company just before sunset.

6. Grass trees at dusk : Cobbler Hill is a pleasant camping ground surrounded by grass trees. The afterlight of dusk provided a great backdrop for these native plants.

7. Endless stars lit up by distant adelaide’s light pollution. One could have spent all night watching the stars like you would never see back in Adelaide. Magellanic clouds were all visible at single frame exposures with the 5dmkII.

8. The dawn shots we went for are missing due to the inclement weather that set in overnight while camping!

2 weeks until our HUGE holiday 🙂

DT