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Too much of a good thing?

Lately I’ve been noticing that social media has been giving me less enjoyment. I feel I’ve been emphasizing physical fitness more than anything else when I’m not working so it was with great frustration that I was disabled for the best part of 1 month while recovering from appendicitis. During that period, I had thought that I would be active on social media and crank out some of the images and videos from the New Zealand trip but it turns out that there wasn’t a whole lot of material from that nightmarish trip. I’ve found myself idly browsing instead and have come to the realisation that I’ve just been wasting a lot of time browsing without interacting, dreaming without acting and worst of all , getting frustrated with inactivity.

Warwick resort, Fiji. Our recent trip was supposed to be one of inactivity and lying around the beach! Weather conditions changed that very quickly! I actually don’t have many pictures to post from that trip and I’ve had to tell myself that that’s OK. I’m waiting to get out in the wilderness again later this year around Seattle and Vancouver!

I suppose everyone has heard of the theory that ‘more is less’ ; implying that an inundation of social media content can result in ‘meaningless’ interaction and actions that are based on obligation rather than a true desire to engage. Then there’s the flipside that ‘less is more; meaning that if you post rarely and only the very cream of your content , each post will have more value. While I agree that both are true from an ‘artistic intent’ point of view, a simpler interpretation of volume content tends to hold true for social media. That is plain and simply ‘more is more’ and ‘less is less’.

Three Sisters. Tongaporutu, New Zealand. It took me a while to get to this image. I wanted to consider my approach before I began processing. In the past, I would have been in a rush to edit this image first and get in online ASAP!

It’s this very demand of social media interaction that leads to a photographer forcing content out when perhaps there isn’t content to be had. I’ll be honest in saying that I certainly felt this pressure but a few years ago, the positive reinforcement of genuine engagement kept driving me to fulfill my post obligation for the day. Sure there was some degree of quality control I would impose upon myself but many of the posts were 2nd and 3rd preference images from a scene I had shot in the past. Some would argue vehemently against this kind of posting behaviour but I guess it all depends on how a photographer wants to portray themselves. I personally don’t mind showing to the world that not every picture I take is of gold quality. Perhaps by showing the lesser versions of an image and the ‘B sides’ others can learn from my mistakes. Perhaps if the leading landscape photographers did this more there would be a portrayal of more fallibility thereby making them more ‘relatable’. It could even be through a ‘BTS’ account which I see many have already done.

Sometimes, posting images is all about just showing the experience that you had. This image won’t be going on our website, but it’s fair game for facebook/instagram/500px etc. I just like to share the moment.

I see this in my line of work as a physician. Too often, case presentations are given where the clinician speaks of an interesting patient using a tone of congratulatory ‘high fiving themselves’ for their ability to pick the final diagnosis. I feel that I learn more from the exact same presentation, but with the emphasis changed to discussing errors and limitations of the team during the process of coming to the final diagnosis. These give invaluable lessons as to how the same diagnosis could be reached in a more efficient way in the future. Relating this back to photography, I’m sure many of you reading this have tried an approach to editing a difficult image where said approach just wasn’t working. Maybe you came back to it a few times, maybe you scrapped it entirely or maybe you asked someone else for some advice in order to achieve the final image you’re proud of. This process of experimentation and ‘fails’ is rarely something that is discussed perhaps for fear of not being seen as an ultimate player in the broadening world of landscape photography. Having said all of this, I do strongly believe that somewhere ,there should be a spot/site reserved for the cream of the crop, a place for pure inspiration to show off what we are most proud of. For me this is our ‘everlookphotography.com’ site (not facebook or instagram)

Sigatoka Dunes after dawn. There’s a huge list of things I’m not happy about with this shot and I don’t feel that I want to achieve too much more with it. For a start, my lens was extremely dusty leading to patches of flares despite a lens hood on. I couldn’t decide if I wanted to attempt temperature contrasts in this image but decided against it given that the scene really was bathed in gold. Perhaps I’ll come back to this image again in the future, but for now, I still like to show it as a grand scene that ‘could have been’ even though I’m not 100% happy with it.

I’m writing this knowing that many people will disagree but if I had a resolution to make about my life in general, it would be to help others through pointing out the mistakes I’ve made and how I learned from them. I’d like to extend this to my photography for a period of time and hope that you can learn through my error prone eyes 🙂

Sigatoka dunes at dawn. This particular morning in Fiji was one of my favourites. I like a series of images I took from the dunes, but I usually give it at least until the next field trip before I decide which images from the last trip to display on our ‘everlook photography’ site.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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“North Island 2018: A journey through dreams and delirium”

 

Before embarking on a family and photographic holiday, I tend to dream big. I dream of all the locations we could visit both as a family and individually at the ends of the day to capture the rugged landscapes with favourable light. I had done my usual route planning through a mixture of using google maps, image searches and asking locals as to what was possible in the area. I had high hopes of shooting scenes that were perhaps slightly out of the box from what was normally shot in the general areas we were staying. Perhaps next trip, I’ll lower those expectations somewhat as several health-related issues threw huge spanners into the machinations of our plans A-Y. Plan Z needed to suffice.

Original plans in red. Adjusted plans in blue.

I won’t go into the details of the health issues except to say that the most minor of the issues was that my rear tooth crown fell off on the first night at dinner. The major issue was that I was suffering from bacteraemia (bacteria growing in the bloodstream) for the first 3 days of the trip due to a worsening case of appendicitis that ended in a small self-contained rupture of that pesky, unnecessary organ. Three days into the trip, I found myself undergoing emergency surgery and thereafter needing some strong pain medication and a prolonged course of antibiotics. In effect, the first 10 days of the trip felt like I was floating painfully through a delirium caused initially by sepsis, then drugs. Marianne had to literally do everything including child minding 24/7, all the lifting of luggage and all of the driving that I would normally do on our trips. It’s amazing that she stayed as sane as she did!

My health issues put into context the types of images I would return with. Instead of long hikes to grand vistas of wilderness, there were short 5 minute walks to roadside locations. Instead of scampering around to find multiple compositions from a scene, I could only stick with one. Instead of carrying a variety of lenses and two cameras to allow simultaneous time-lapse and stills shooting at various focal lengths, I could only carry one body and one extra lens as I was not allowed heavy lifting in the recovery period. Astro photography was the one genre that needed to be wiped out entirely as I needed all the rest I could get. Overall, it was such a disappointment to have to deal with these limitations, but it did make me focus on maximising what I could make of any given scene which was a positive.

Tauranga

Mount Manganui is an easily accessed mountain that juts above the landscape north west of Tauranga. After a 20 -30 minute walk , a precarious view point allows great images of the rising sun over the township of Mount Manganui and Tauranga beyond. I intended to take images of night followed by twilight to blend in the city lights, but the changing light and subsequent white balance made this somewhat tricky. In retrospect, I wondered why I was shivering up on the summit while every one else was in shorts. On the way down, right sided abdominal pain with each step was a sure sign  that something was going wrong in the belly! No further images were possible from the area which was a shame as we really wanted to visit the Rotorua Redwoods at night as a family.

Mount Manganui as a ‘time stacked’ image. Lights from before dawn and lights in the sky from after dawn

Hawke’s Bay

I had so many plans for this area including a walk beyond Cape Kidnappers and visiting a few of the local waterfalls. Because I was stuck in Tauranga hospital, we had to forfeit one night’s stay here which meant our trip here was just an overnighter en-route to Castlepoint. By this stage, I could walk one pace at a time while dopey on tramadol and I could not wear by usual filter pouch on my waist. As such, those long walks transformed into a 100m morning stroll to the beach where I shot some images with intentional camera motion to represent my delirium.

It was a real struggle to walk the 50m out to the shore from our apartment but I just wanted some fresh air!

Castlepoint:

Things were starting to improve by this point in the trip. I was able to walk short distances, but I was now troubled with antibiotic side effects! I had planned to walk up Castle Rock for a different vantage point of the coast and I had planned to walk beneath the lighthouse at low tide. Both options were simply not possible, so I carried as light a pack as possible to photograph the lighthouse. On our last morning, I even felt game enough to use a ladder to get to a different vantage point.

It took all my energy to get here while my original plan was to climb the hill in the background!

Turangi:

Our three nights here was the turning point in the trip. I was nearly a week post op now which meant that I could drive! I had also changed my own antibiotic dosing to cover the infection and to minimise my side effects. Narcotic analgaesia also went out the window here thankfully! As such I was able to find a few compositions here which I think are relatively unique including various images of the ‘Taupo Tree’, somewhat of a poor cousin to her famous Wanaka counterpart. During our drive from Castlepoint to Turangi I had noted some remarkable roadside spots along the desert road which I returned to at dawn. We were blessed with some great light displays during our time here and my mind wonders as to what I would have seen from the summits of the Tongariro Alpine Crossing given the amazing roadside light that I experienced.

This image of Ngauruhoe was remarkable only a short distance from the highway!

The ‘Taupo’ tree was an easy option as I could drive the 5 minutes there while not on strong painkillers. As it turns out,it was a pretty cool location!

Waitomo:

Our main objective here was to give the kids a great experience staying on a farm-based BNB where they could interact with the animals. We also wanted them to experience the glow worms where now at least Charlotte will be able to remember the experience more clearly. Along the way, there were some great streams and waterfalls to shoot in the area including the mighty Marokopa falls and the beautiful natural arches and tunnels. I would say that I did not have to modify my original plans much in this area at all. The biggest challenge was the muddy descent to the base of Marokopa Falls which was as slippery and mucky as I remembered from our 2014 trip. My ulterior motive here was to try for a requested postcard shot of Marokopa falls. It was also serendipitous that our evening glow worm tour had no other occupants and that our host Kyle was very interested in photography. As such, I was given the time to attempt some glow worm photography with moderate exposures. To do a proper job, I would need a private tour to allow 30minutes to an hour for a single composition instead of the 5 minutes that I had given the kids were with us as well.

The amazing glow worm staircase of Footwhistle’s cave.

Marokopa Falls was roaring but the trip down to the base was very messy ! Be warned!

Urenui:

Our final landscape location was the idyllic seaside holiday spot of Urenui, 30km north of New Plymouth. Due to my improving health, I again did not feel that my shooting was hampered other than not being able to carry enough gear for simultaneous time-lapse shooting with a second body.  The conditions here were very good though by playing it safe with the tides, the opportunities for very dynamic (and potentially risky) shots were taken away. The coast here can be very wild, but our experience was that of placid seas and comfortable kid friendly environments. I would want to challenge myself at a later date to visit with a higher tide at some stage in the future. The three sisters (now two due to erosion the of the third sister) were the main feature along the south side of the Tongaporutu river. Despite how amazing the North Side appears, I found it extremely difficult to find engaging compositions here. I have a short video of access to the North side for those interested in exploration. The seascape opportunities around Urenui itself were also good! At the western end of the beach, there are a series of arches that can be accessed at low tide but unfortunately, the largest collapsed recently resulting in an isolated seastack and surrounding debris. Our final dawn here was the onset of wilder weather to come for our departure which included a farewell gift of a rainbow.

Post sunset hues of the remaining two sisters (of three) with Taranaki blazing red in the distance on the horizon

Our last morning of shooting was punctuated by a rainbow – a sign of hope for the future!!!

In summary, the last 7-8 days of our trip felt like it was approximating our usual travelling style. By the time we returned to Auckland, we were all in the mood to do ‘homely’ weekend things including normal shopping and eating asian food (of which Auckland has plenty of choices , including probably the best Roti Canai I have had in memory at a food court in Manukau). Unfortunately, the toll of the first 10 days of my illness and the subsequent stresses placed on Marianne and the kids meant that things never really felt the same afterward. By the end of the trip I was able to give Marianne much more ‘me’ time by taking the kids off her hands, something which I would be doing throughout the trip. I was so sad to hear Charlotte say (with a smile though) that she would like the first 10 days of our trip back because I wasn’t there ☹ I don’t know  how many of you have experienced bad luck like this on your holidays but as a cliché to conclude upon : finding ways to view the experience in a positive light and finding ways to stick together go a long way toward normalising such a traumatic and disruptive event. Photographically, the key for me was to not focus on ‘what could have been’ but how I could best adapt to my changing health status.

Walking back from the three sisters after a great sunset shoot and nature play for the girls. Things were approaching normality finally by this stage.

Sunshine in winter

For the last two years now, we’ve headed up to Queensland to escape the Adelaide winter (not that it’s that severe). Each time, we’ve been blessed with variable conditions. This year’s trip was an extended family trip to the Sunshine Coast where we were based in Tewantin. This made it a great base to explore Noosa Heads National Park in particular. I’ll explain the rationale behind some of the images from each location.

Day 1: Morning at Dolphin Rock.

The reason I wanted to visit this location was due to its influence on my early photographic ‘career’. I had seen numerous images of this rock at Point Cartwright by flickr contacts and wanted to see it for myself. Given how short our trip was, I had no option to plan appropriate tides so I really had to deal with what I was given. Thanks to rough directions from Brisbane photographer Martin Canning, I was able to find the rock very quickly after parking the car at the nearby lighthouse car park. The timelapse below shows an advancing tide with the evolution of light. My aim was to capture dynamic motion flowing over the rocks and eventually, to capture a sunstar image based on the ‘tip’ of the dolphin’s nose. I managed to catch up with long time flickr friend Adam Randell here as well.

Sunstar over Dolphin Rock at Point Cartwright

Day 1: Raining light at Noosa heads

On our first evening, we walked to the first cove along the coastal trail at Noosa Heads national park. While we were exploring the area looking for crabs and other wildlife with the kids, I spotted a group of rocks which I thought might light up well at sunset. As a downpour occurred which sent the rest of the family running for cover, the area was lit in a haze of orange and gold which I tried to capture with my hastily scouted foreground elements.  Due to the rain, I shot most of these images without filters and gave the kim wipes a great workout to keep the shots clean! Unfortunately, this was the last shoot with my Sony A7r2 as I fell in the water with it 😦 . I met Stephen Waller by chance here as well .

Light breaking through rain and clouds

The last series of shots before camera death!

Day 2: Smooth Granite

On the following morning, I was on a bit of a downer as the camera had not managed to revive itself overnight. Nonetheless, I did bring two bodies on this trip (1 for timelapses). My goal for this particular morning was to scout the coastline along the northern shores of the national park. The tide was high which restricted many opportunities but I settled for photographing the smooth granite boulders at the appropriately named Granite Bay. There wasn’t much light on offer due to thick bank of cloud on the horizon but an after dawn, the sun finally made its appearance. I wanted to capture a long exposure with accentuation of the foreground rock patterns leading toward the tall granite boulder. This was best achieved as wide as possible using the Laowa 12mm lens. I also wanted to capture golden light falling upon the rocks but during a long exposure, I would have been very limited by the huge dynamic range involved with attempting this as a single capture. I therefore blended the long exposure shot with a few shorter exposures for the light on the rocks taken without any filters on.

After I had finished shooting at Granite Bay, I did some scouting for potential evening shoot locations. I decided to take some travel oriented shots of the many surfers at Tea Tree Bay enjoying the beautiful winter sunshine.

A blend of several long and short exposures to accentuate the smooth textures and light. Long exposure taken with 10 stop ND filter.

Image with ND filter on the left for smooth skies and water. Image without filters on the right for the light on the rocks

Tea Tree Bay in the early morning

Day 2: Suburban Forests at Buderim

During the day, we took the kids for an easy rainforest walk to the base of the waterfalls at Buderim . We found it remarkable that such lush scenery could be in very close proximity to surburbia. There had not been much rain in the preceding week, hence the waterfall was barely flowing. I noticed light falling upon a fern in front of the waterfall and set out to photograph the scene with the fern framing the waterfall. It was quite difficult to obtain this perspective and I ended up having to take my ballhead off the tripod and wedge it on to a rock to keep it steady while taking these 0.3 to 0.5 second exposures. The morning made for a great family outing with relatively easy access. Thereafter, the kids had fun at the Ginger factory before we returned home for Jaime’s (our 3 year old) nap.

Serenity Falls at Buderim Forest.

A video of the girls fun activities in Noosa.

Day 2: Reflections from Tea Tree Bay

This set of rock pools caught my eye as I was walking back from the morning shoot, so I had an easy destination to head toward in the evening. It was fortunate that I had scouted the position earlier in the day as I nearly missed sunset due to the parking madness at the National Park on a Sunday evening. Fortunately , after stalking some departing surfers, I was able to find a park and dash off to Tea Tree Bay. For the earlier image (middle) I had set up to photograph a focus stack with foreground rock and sky frames. While waiting for the light to evolve however, I found more appealing shapes in the same area and photographed those instead. Unfortunately, in the rush of moving around, I did not focus stack so there are some soft elements to the very immediate foreground.

Portraits of the light at Tea Tree Bay

Day 3: Paradise undiscovered

This was to be my last morning of shooting on the trip. I had read about some caves along the Eastern Beaches but knew it might be a little dicey to reach them since I had not scouted the area and would be approaching in the dark. After a couple of false trails leading to cliff faces, I found my way down to the shoreline north of Alexandra Beach and looked around in the dark for the caves. It turns out that one of my false trails in the dark was actually the right trail ! Next time i’ll know where to go to get into the caves proper but for this particular morning, I kept the shoot relatively dry and watched as a grey dawn turn gold yet again once the sun peeked through. All in all, it was a great short break which I found very refreshing since Noosa is a much more relaxed part of the world than the Gold Coast. In between family outings, most of the coastal locations were relatively to access with lots of different possibilities at dawn and dusk. Hopefully , we will return in the future!

The waves can really crash hard at this location – I chose to play it safe having already lost one body for the trip.

Long exposure panorama of the churning coastline at Paradise Caves (to the left of frame)