Blog Archives

2018 : A year of living and photographing

It’s that time of year again! This year I thought I’d stray a little into a discussion about what I’ve learned in life and perhaps that may give context to my approach to photography this year. The major life event this year was being septic with appendicitis after trying to ‘tough it out’ for far too long. That resulted in a more complicated operation, a longer recovery and a second admission to hospital for another complication. It gave me a focus on considering what the most important aspects of life to me are. Photography is up there for sure, but health and family underpin all of it. Hence , photography this year has revolved around family needs more so than ever. Despite this, the photography year has still been very good to me and it’s given me more fuel to add to my constantly burning feeling of ‘impostor syndrome’.  Rather than presenting 2018 as a timeline, I thought I’d change tact and discuss several themes instead.

Extended family holidays:

Our first trip this year was with extended family to Yorke Peninsula in February. For those reading from South Australia, James Well is an amazing place to stay during the local crabbing season and we certainly took full toll of our weekend there with plenty of seafood to celebrate Chinese New Year. I love summer holidays away as most of the time, I can photography dawns and be back in time for the family breakfasts. If I’m lucky, I may even sneak in a sunset shoot or two during the trips. On this trip, I managed to photography a couple of places I had never been to before and ones which I had not seen many images of.

Wool Bay Jetty had lots of possibilities with a cliff overlooking from behind this position

 

Edithburgh Tidal pool on a blazing sunrise , one of few tidal pools I know if in South Australia?

Competitions:

In the past , I’ve been guilty of overthinking competitions. Competitions aren’t the reason I take photographs, instead, they’re a nice source of external validation if I happen to do well. Sometimes, I even used to enter competitions with a mindset of only entering images that I felt that they were within my invented moral framework of photography. If it went well, I wanted to say a big ‘screw you’ to those images which did not fall within this framework. Guess what – it never worked ! When you’re attempting to break into the top end of any field whether it be sport, academic pursuit or photographic competition, ‘one percenters’ to push limits count. The entrants who respect the rules to the limits with their amazing images will do well. And so, I only chose two competitions to enter this year: the Australian Geographic nature photographer of the year and the Epson Panorama Awards. The former because of the inbuilt ‘RAW check’ that is required for every shortlisted finalist image. The latter because the images seem more true to landscapes than many other ‘landscape’ competitions which seem based more on the ability to use nature as mere guideline for subsequent art. In the panorama awards, I’ve got over my angst-filled deliberations about whether to enter cropped images since most winners in recent times have been cropped images rather than stitched panoramas. I also threw away my ‘pro’ vs ‘amateur’ principle for the sake of the competition as I wanted to see how I fared with all comers in ‘open’ competition. I still consider myself an amateur at heart with far limited opportunities than ‘professional’ photographers who do it for a living. I’ve had this mindset for a few years now , and it’s only been this year that I’ve had some breakthrough results. So I don’t feel that this change of attitude has been the reason for my successes in 2018, but rather, it simply means that I’m not disappointed if the images don’t perform as well as I had hoped. Meanwhile, several organisations have benefited financially from my chase of external validation!

6th place in Open Nature category , Epson Panorama Award, 91/100

 

7th place, Open Nature category in the Epson Panorama awards : 91/100

 

Finalist, Australian Geograhic NPOTY

Physical health and rehabilitation:

People sometimes ask me why I do the amount of exercise that I do. The easiest answer is that I like it! There’s no way anyone would just run 40-50km a week just for the sake of it. The benefit of keeping fit is to be able to go that bit further, have that much more clarity of mind without having to worry about fatigue after long walks. It helps significantly on the backpacking trips (which requires a different kind of fitness) but even more so during the family holidays when I’m rushing to get to locations before dawn and the rushing back to get back to join the family for the rest of the day. I had grand plans scouted out in advance before the New Zealand trip, but had to adapt to roadside shooting due to the unexpected bout of appendicitis. Over and above this, while attempting to regain fitness in May, I had quite a nasty bike accident coming down from the hills on my bike which set me back further. For several months I just didn’t have the full confidence in my body but thanks to my greyhound Flynn, our morning jogs helped to get me on the rehab track. We’ve got into such a pattern that later in the year, I even managed to run a personal record time for the City to Bay an completely unexpectedly snagged first place for my age! I didn’t do a lot of hiking in Canada or BC but hopefully next January I’ll be able to test out the benefits of this years rehabbing during a one week solo trip to Tasmania.

Rehabbing slowly with Flynn , our latest addition to the family 😉

Sponsorship and photographic income:

Our relationship with NiSi and Pikitia continue to be our main sources of trickle income. On the side, there seems to be an interest in prints and tutorials every so often, particularly after favourable competition results! Overall, this means that photography is a self sustaining hobby. Throughout the year, I managed to edit a few scripts for NiSi and tested out their Titanium circular polariser. It turns out that its more of a warming cooling filter but still does its intended job well. I hope that with any partnership that I undertake, I can continue to give honest opinions rather than feel forced into praising the hand that feeds me. I feel that as someone who doesn’t depend on photographic income to survive, it leaves me in the best position to keep acting in this manner. Marianne has also branched out in to tripadvisor. We were part of a beta that recently launched in November and have a steady build up of followers.

Test scenario for NiSi’s Titanium CPL

Local shooting:

This year I’ve ventured locally far less than I used to. To a degree, there’s photographic fatigue with visiting the same locations over and over ; even if I haven’t achieved the shot I’ve always had in my mind for certain locations. The main limiting factor is that the kids are growing up and I’ve chosen to stay home on weekends – particularly now that we seem to have established a Sunday pancake routine! I do look forward to the summer months though. From November to February, I can comfortably head out on a local shoot and wrap up after dawn before coming home to take part in the morning activities, be it sport or breakfast related.

Brown Hill has been a new spot to visit thanks to its proximity to home

 

Mannum Falls after moderate rain never disappoints

 

Only one visit to Port Willunga , an old friend

 

New year started off at Petrel Cove – I might be heading down there again!

Our ‘regular’ holidays:

Last but not least, we did go on several trips this year. The March trip to North Island was intertwined with a conference at Tauranga which I needed to attend as a physician trainee supervisor. This was the appendicitis interrupted trip. Since Marianne was pretty stressed out from that trip and fatigued, we decided to try out a resort holiday in Fiji during shoulder season in May. Finally, another perioperative conference was being held in Seattle in October which made it perfect timing for visiting the Northern hemisphere in fall.  All of these trips were planned with dawn photographic opportunities in mind. For the most part, we stayed at self catering homes and based ourselves for three nights at any one location. These are some of my favourite shots from each ‘stop’ that we stayed at.

Tauranga  was the first stop at North Island. I really only went on one shoot in the midst of my delirium and vaguely remember pain in my right groin each step of the way down!

Mount Manganui pre and post dawn

Hawke’s Bay was the next stop where I had planned to do some long hikes to Cape Kidnappers. Instead, I settled for 50m outside our accommodation at Napier.

Dreaming of walking, restricted to hobbling

I was hoping to shoot from the top of Castle Rock at Castlepoint but it looks like many others have now beat me to it! Oh well, another visit will have to do!

The topdown view from Castle Rock will have to wait!

Around Taupo, I ventured out to the desert road to shoot Ngauruhoe. We were staying very close to this lone tree along the shores of Lake Taupo as well.

The ‘Taupo’ tree

 

Mount Doom at dawn

The Waitomo area was famous for its glow worms but I don’t feel I did it justice. Instead, I took a mud bath at Marokopa Falls…

Mighty muddy Marokopa Falls

 

My glow worm attempt!

Our final stop was at Urenui near New Plymouth. I had hoped to visit Taranaki again but due to health, I restricted myself to the coastline.

Goblin Forests around Taranaki with the kids

 

Three sisters at Tongaporutu

 

Whitecliff waterfall barely flowing

 

Our final morning , 5 minutes walk from our accommodation

Fiji was a great place to unwind however, for 2 of our 5 days , we had wild weather! This gave nice photographic opportunities at various locations though.

Tidal waves at the Warwick Resort!

 

Rainbow at Maui Bay after heavy rains

 

Biasevu waterfall was flowing very nicely

 

I visited Sigatoka sand dunes courtesy of a back route more known to locals

By the time we arrived in Seattle in late September, life had more or less returned to normal. Everyone’s health had miraculously stayed in tact (last trip we all suffered from Influenza A!). The kids adjusted well to long haul flights and time zone changes. I could not have imagined a more smooth process getting from home to each of our locations. In fact, other than the kids being loud in a Seattle townhouse causing mild friction with neighbours, all of our accommodation choices were great! There was a bit of a downer toward the end of the trip when we were rained in for consecutive days but the weather did clear and we finished off the trip with a quick visit to Disneyland on the way home.

Crazy fall colours at Mount Seymour

 

Cliff Falls at Kanaka Creek

After a few days in metro Vancouver to get over jetlag, we headed over to Port Renfrew on Vancouver Island . I felt that this was the best location of the trip accompanied by great weather after a washed out start.

Harris Cove in the grey

 

Harris Cove ablaze! A few days later

 

Sombrio Beach hidden waterfall

 

Sandcut Falls at dawn

 

Parkinson Creek on the way to Payzant Creek (which we didn’t make it to)

 

The beautiful lone tree in Fairy Lake

After battling an epic day of traffic to get back to the Mount Rainier area, the weather settled in meaning we lost sight of mountains for good!

Our last view of Mount Rainier for the trip! What fall colours!

 

Fall colours in the rain at Skate Creek

 

Black bear at Paradise

 

Marmot at Paradise!

 

Upper section of Christine Falls

We left Mount Rainier to first snows! Thereafter, it cleared up during our drive, only for the weather to settle in again as we arrived at Forks, our base for exploring the Olympic Peninsula. Rain meant that the focus was largely on waterfalls, though the weather cleared up on the very last morning.

Rialto Beach with dying light

 

Sol Duc Falls in the rain

 

Second Beach in beautiful sunshine as we were leaving!

 

Bunch Creek Falls on the way back to urbanisation

The rest of the trip was based in Seattle for my conference followed by a quick visit to Disneyland !

Seattle at sunset – minus Mount Rainier

Hurrah to the finale of our trip! So glad the girls got to see Disneyland at night!

Final words:

I feel refreshed and healthy at the end of 2018. Next year, we’re taking on home renovations which could see us a bit quieter on the photographic front. We have two trips to Tassie planned so far – one solo, one with extended family. Hopefully we’ll be able to sneak in a couple more trips locally and hopefully the girls continue to develop their hiking legs and appreciation of nature. My most important lesson learned this year was to have a stark reminder of the priorities in life. Good health and family should never be underestimated. See you in 2019 from all of us!

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

NiSi Titanium CPL Filter Review

This is a review of NiSi’s new Titanium CPL. NiSi were kind enough to send me an 82mm thread screw on CPL which fits onto my Canon 24-70mm F2.8II lens. For information about the benefits and limitations of using a CPL, see my previous article here: https://everlookphotography.wordpress.com/2017/09/19/tips-for-using-a-cpl-effectively/

There is a sad story of my first attempt to review this filter. I had started taking shots on a recent trip to Vancouver when unfortunately during transit, the camera fell lens first onto hard ground. As you can see from the picture below, the glass shattered so I had to dispose of the filter, but you might also make out that the Titanium frame is actually in-tact. Previously when this situation has occurred (I try not to make a habit of dropping my camera gear lens first!) , I’ve had great difficulty removing the filter but in this case, perhaps the strength of the Titanium filter maintained its integrity allowing an easy removal despite a hard impact. There was absolutely no science behind those assumptions but it does explain why I don’t have any ‘before and after’ forest images to show you.

Foliage glare is greatly reduced by using a CPL in forest and waterfall scenes. The smashed filter below was used to create this image before its untimely death.

You can see the blueish appearance of the filter along with its in-tact frame! RIP Ti CPL

This actual review is based on a shoot from Port Noarlunga. I intentionally chose this location as my preferred composition was close to perpendicular to the sunrise. Maximal polarisation tends to occur 90 degrees to a light source so these compositions allow a good test of how the filter might affect the sky in the image. As I was overlooking water from a cliff, it also allowed me to test the ability of the filter to allow ‘see through’ to the river floor. It is important to point out that this filter is a screw on filter that is independent of NiSi’s filter holder systems . This is another reason why I chose not to shoot directly into light else under normal circumstances, I would be using NiSi’s V5 filter holder setup and inbuilt CPL so that I can use other GND filters.

Planning the shoot : Aiming the shot perpendicular to sunrise.

I will make no comment on the packaging and presentation of the filter itself other than to say that it is as professional as other NiSi products and as a photographer who rips of the wrapping to get into the gear ASAP, it won’t bear any influence on your results. I liked it.

The appearance of the filter looks as though it might cool the image due to a blueish tint. I was also intrigued by doing a ‘screen test’. You can do this at home by holding up a CPL in front of a computer monitor and rotating it 90 degrees. Previous versions of CPLs have blacked out the screen at specific orientations whereas this filter gave a warming/cooling effect depending on its orientation. It’s solidly built and as mentioned before, the frame withstood a belting during an accident! It rotates seamlessly and smoothly.

During my field testing , I came to the following conclusions which you can view from the images below:

  • The see through effect is well achieved in the water and the polarisation effect is visible in the sky. Interestingly in the position I was shooting, the polarisation of the sky was most defined in the image with water unpolarised. Similarly, you can see that the image with ‘see through’ water has a more homogenous sky appearance with less definition.
  • The images confirm the warming/cooling effect of this filter. Both images below have been adjusted to have exactly the same white balance and tint (7200k , tint 11) . You can definitely see that the image on the right with ‘see through’ effect has the warmer appearance. (All other minor slider adjustments in lightroom were identical between both images which were also taken with a 3 stop soft edged GND handheld to best demonstrate the sky effect of the polariser).
  • This filter blocks approximately 1.66 to 2 stops of light. This needs to be taken into consideration when adjusting shutter speed for an appropriate exposure. This degree of light blocking is similar to NiSi’s filter holder system CPLs.

Demonstration of polarising and warming/cooling effects.

Another demonstration of the sky polarisation and how many stops of light the Titanium CPL blocks.

My conclusion is that this an excellent filter that will give you all of the desirable properties of a CPL. Because it is a screw on filter, it is more suited to walk-around handheld shooting. This is not the filter you are after if you are predominantly shooting with a tripod and wish to use other GNDs and ND filters to prolong exposure.  After testing this filter, I would be asking myself questions in two different scenarios (with proposed answers):

  • If I don’t have a CPL , should I buy this filter? My answer is yes. It is my opinion that a CPL is an invaluable piece of equipment for the landscape photographer and unfortunately, it’s just not practical to walk around with any filter holder kit setup all the time. A tougher question is whether you should buy this filter over another CPL and without having used other brands in a while, I can’t confidently answer this question for you other than to vouch for the quality of this filter in isolation.
  • If I already have a CPL, what does this filter add? To me, its advantages are in its build quality (no science to back this up!), and its warming/cooling effect. I guess much of this also depends on how much you aim to get images looking as you want ‘in camera’. This filter definitely allows you to achieve varying ‘in camera’ results. Otherwise, I personally would find it hard to justify buying this filter over and above the already excellent HUC series of screw on filters that NiSi offer (or other brand equivalents).

I hope this provides you some useful information about the filter and if you have any questions, ask away in the comments below! Here are some edited images taken with the Titanium CPL.

Steelhead Falls, Maple Ridge, BC

The ‘cool’ version of Onkaparinga River mouth.

The ‘warm’ version of the Onkaparinga River mouth

Too much of a good thing?

Lately I’ve been noticing that social media has been giving me less enjoyment. I feel I’ve been emphasizing physical fitness more than anything else when I’m not working so it was with great frustration that I was disabled for the best part of 1 month while recovering from appendicitis. During that period, I had thought that I would be active on social media and crank out some of the images and videos from the New Zealand trip but it turns out that there wasn’t a whole lot of material from that nightmarish trip. I’ve found myself idly browsing instead and have come to the realisation that I’ve just been wasting a lot of time browsing without interacting, dreaming without acting and worst of all , getting frustrated with inactivity.

Warwick resort, Fiji. Our recent trip was supposed to be one of inactivity and lying around the beach! Weather conditions changed that very quickly! I actually don’t have many pictures to post from that trip and I’ve had to tell myself that that’s OK. I’m waiting to get out in the wilderness again later this year around Seattle and Vancouver!

I suppose everyone has heard of the theory that ‘more is less’ ; implying that an inundation of social media content can result in ‘meaningless’ interaction and actions that are based on obligation rather than a true desire to engage. Then there’s the flipside that ‘less is more; meaning that if you post rarely and only the very cream of your content , each post will have more value. While I agree that both are true from an ‘artistic intent’ point of view, a simpler interpretation of volume content tends to hold true for social media. That is plain and simply ‘more is more’ and ‘less is less’.

Three Sisters. Tongaporutu, New Zealand. It took me a while to get to this image. I wanted to consider my approach before I began processing. In the past, I would have been in a rush to edit this image first and get in online ASAP!

It’s this very demand of social media interaction that leads to a photographer forcing content out when perhaps there isn’t content to be had. I’ll be honest in saying that I certainly felt this pressure but a few years ago, the positive reinforcement of genuine engagement kept driving me to fulfill my post obligation for the day. Sure there was some degree of quality control I would impose upon myself but many of the posts were 2nd and 3rd preference images from a scene I had shot in the past. Some would argue vehemently against this kind of posting behaviour but I guess it all depends on how a photographer wants to portray themselves. I personally don’t mind showing to the world that not every picture I take is of gold quality. Perhaps by showing the lesser versions of an image and the ‘B sides’ others can learn from my mistakes. Perhaps if the leading landscape photographers did this more there would be a portrayal of more fallibility thereby making them more ‘relatable’. It could even be through a ‘BTS’ account which I see many have already done.

Sometimes, posting images is all about just showing the experience that you had. This image won’t be going on our website, but it’s fair game for facebook/instagram/500px etc. I just like to share the moment.

I see this in my line of work as a physician. Too often, case presentations are given where the clinician speaks of an interesting patient using a tone of congratulatory ‘high fiving themselves’ for their ability to pick the final diagnosis. I feel that I learn more from the exact same presentation, but with the emphasis changed to discussing errors and limitations of the team during the process of coming to the final diagnosis. These give invaluable lessons as to how the same diagnosis could be reached in a more efficient way in the future. Relating this back to photography, I’m sure many of you reading this have tried an approach to editing a difficult image where said approach just wasn’t working. Maybe you came back to it a few times, maybe you scrapped it entirely or maybe you asked someone else for some advice in order to achieve the final image you’re proud of. This process of experimentation and ‘fails’ is rarely something that is discussed perhaps for fear of not being seen as an ultimate player in the broadening world of landscape photography. Having said all of this, I do strongly believe that somewhere ,there should be a spot/site reserved for the cream of the crop, a place for pure inspiration to show off what we are most proud of. For me this is our ‘everlookphotography.com’ site (not facebook or instagram)

Sigatoka Dunes after dawn. There’s a huge list of things I’m not happy about with this shot and I don’t feel that I want to achieve too much more with it. For a start, my lens was extremely dusty leading to patches of flares despite a lens hood on. I couldn’t decide if I wanted to attempt temperature contrasts in this image but decided against it given that the scene really was bathed in gold. Perhaps I’ll come back to this image again in the future, but for now, I still like to show it as a grand scene that ‘could have been’ even though I’m not 100% happy with it.

I’m writing this knowing that many people will disagree but if I had a resolution to make about my life in general, it would be to help others through pointing out the mistakes I’ve made and how I learned from them. I’d like to extend this to my photography for a period of time and hope that you can learn through my error prone eyes 🙂

Sigatoka dunes at dawn. This particular morning in Fiji was one of my favourites. I like a series of images I took from the dunes, but I usually give it at least until the next field trip before I decide which images from the last trip to display on our ‘everlook photography’ site.